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The people I've met through AGC have helped me both personally and professionally. Every contractor needs those resources and those relationships. If you want to be successful, well then, you need AGC.

Phyllis Harden

Legislative & Special Projects, Pine Bluff Sand & Gravel
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Safety & Health

December 22, 2016

On Dec. 19, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published a final rule to revise existing language in the recordkeeping regulation to emphasize an employer’s responsibility to make and maintain accurate OSHA 300 Logs and all related incident reports.  The new rule drastically expands on the existing regulatory language and in some cases added new provisions.  While the newly published rule does make clear OSHA’s expectations involving the maintenance of injury and illness records, the true impetus for the rulemaking is to drastically expand the agency’s statute of limitation granted by the OSH Act. The OSH Act clearly states that “no citations may be issued after the expiration of six months following the occurrence of any violation.” However, this new rule will allow contractors to be cited for honest mistakes, or inaccuracies, related to recordkeeping dating back as far as five-and-a-half years.  OSHA’s justification is that an omission of an injury or illness from the OSHA 300 Log constitutes an ongoing occurrence until corrected during the five-year retention period under the recordkeeping regulation. 

December 7, 2016

All companies should have a plan of action for shutting down job sites for the holidays, along with an outside supervisor who is qualified to properly evaluate the site and make suggestions for improvements. 

October 24, 2016

Learn More on AGC WebED Oct. 31 from 2-3:00 p.m. ET

October 21, 2016

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) this week delayed enforcement until Dec. 1, 2016, of the anti-retaliation provisions in its injury and illness reporting rule, which highlighted OSHA’s intention to enforce policies that could restrict mandatory post-incident alcohol and drug testing.

October 3, 2016

The 78% increase in the Occupational Health and Safety Administration's penalty structure is now in effect, as are new reporting and record-keeping rules. OSHA is working hard to get the word out and offer employers guidance, but contractors should stay on top of OSHA's efforts.

October 3, 2016

Although the general level of safety for construction workers has improved over the years, this isn't true for catastrophic and fatal events. The resultant exposure of employers to penalties suggests that underlying assumptions for the industry's safety pyramid are due for a reassessment, write attorney Lawrence Dany and loss prevention specialist Ray Master.

July 26, 2016

Intensifying its effort to dissuade the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) from interpreting its new recordkeeping regulations to restrict drug testing or safety incentive programs, AGC of America presses for a formal audience with the top OSHA official.

At the heart the controversy surrounding the new regulations are two provisions that merely state:

July 20, 2016

OSHA, EPA and FWS Finalize New Maximum Civil Penalties

The financial penalties that federal agencies may impose on the regulated community as restitution (or a deterrent) for any violation of statutes/regulations or permit requirements are about to go way up, some by as much as 150 percent.  The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) – to name a few – all have finalized penalty increases that take effect this summer.

May 26, 2016

<p>This week, AGC delivered a <a href="http://newsmanager.commpartners.com/agcleg/downloads/2016-05-25%20Letter%20on%20Recordkeeping%20Hearing.pdf"><u>letter</u> </a>to the House Education and the Workforce Committee for a hearing that examined the Occupational Safety &amp; Health Administration’s (OSHA) rule on Improved Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses. AGC is concerned the rule will significantly limit how employers are able to enforce policies that have been established to ensure timely reporting of incidents, as well as implement and enforce other safety and health policies. The rule could discourage employers from administering post-accident drug testing, and the rule would also place employer safety incentive programs in jeopardy.</p>

April 21, 2016

<p>Court officials announced late last week that an AGC of America-backed lawsuit to block the Obama Administration’s misguided new silica rule will be heard in the D.C. Circuit Court.&nbsp; AGC, via the Louisiana AGC, filed suit in the 5th Circuit earlier this month to block the measure, arguing that the Administration established a new standard that is beyond the technological limits of current dust removal equipment. As a number of other groups filed similar motions in other circuit courts, judicial officials were forced to select a venue via random lottery.&nbsp; While the DC Circuit is considered less favorable than the 5th Circuit, some of the circuit’s prior case law does appear favorable.</p>

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