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Utility Infrastructure

October 18, 2012
Forty years ago today, the primary federal law in the United States governing water pollution went into effect. The Federal Water Pollution Control Amendments of 1972, known as the Clean Water Act (CWA), became law after the bill was vetoed by President Nixon.
August 4, 2012
Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) introduced legislation that would create a trust fund to be used to assess user fees on water users and products that affect the water stream in attempts to generate around $9 billion per year to pay for water infrastructure projects. To generate $9 billion annually, the bill proposes fees at the manufacturer level on bottled beverages, pharmaceuticals, and flushable products (personal hygiene, toiletries, cooking oils, etc.). None of these groups are supportive of the legislation and the bottlers have come out strongly opposed to paying into the fund.
June 29, 2012
The House Appropriations Committee approved the FY 2013 Interior and Environment Appropriations bill, which includes funding for the Department of the Interior, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Forest Service, and various independent and related agencies. In total, the bill cuts of $1.2 billion below last year’s level, with $870 million (or 73 percent) coming in the form of cuts to the State Revolving Funds (SRF) for clean water and drinking water infrastructure.
June 22, 2012
This week, the House Interior/Environment Appropriations Subcommittee marked up its FY 2013 funding legislation for the Department of the Interior and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which also contains the funding for EPA’s State Revolving Funds (SRF) for clean water and drinking water infrastructure.
June 22, 2012
AGC joined other industry groups this week in sending a letter to members of the House Appropriations Committee making sure State Revolving Fund (SRF) projects are not hampered by harmful Buy American provisions. The House Interior/Environment Appropriations Subcommittee was reportedly working on language that would have applied requirements that the iron, steel, and manufactured goods on SRF projects are domestically sourced.
June 21, 2012
This week, the House Interior/Environment Appropriations Subcommittee marked up its FY 2013 funding legislation for the Department of the Interior and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which also contains the funding for EPA’s State Revolving Funds (SRF) for clean water and drinking water infrastructure.
June 9, 2012
AGC recently submitted comments on a proposed rule issued by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) that addressed federal enforcement of state damage prevention laws. This proposed rule establishes the criteria for determining the adequacy of state enforcement of pipeline damage prevention laws and proposes a process for federal enforcement under the authority of the Pipeline Inspection, Protection, Safety, and Enforcement (PIPES) Act of 2006.
June 4, 2012
AGC Submitted comments on a proposed rule issued by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) that addressed federal enforcement of state damage prevention laws. This proposed rule establishes the criteria for determining the adequacy of state enforcement of pipeline damage prevention laws and proposes a process for federal enforcement under the authority of the Pipeline Inspection, Protection, Safety, and Enforcement (PIPES) Act of 2006.
April 5, 2012
The long-awaited proposed rule from the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) on state damage prevention programs was published on Monday, April 2. The 2006 Pipeline Inspection, Protection, Enforcement, and Safety Act (PIPES Act) requires PHMSA to enforce damage prevention laws where a state damage prevention program is deemed inadequate to do so. This proposed rule is designed to lay out the criteria PHMSA will use to judge whether a state damage prevention program is adequate and what actions the federal government will take once a state has been deemed inadequate.
March 31, 2012
Senators Barrasso (R-Wy.), Inhofe (R-Okla.), Heller (R-Nev.) and Sessions (R-Ala.), along with 26 of their colleagues, introduced legislation to stop the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) from implementing its guidance on Clean Water Act jurisdiction.

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