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July 10, 2009
On June 26, the U.S. House passed H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act, by a vote of 219 to 212 (8 Republicans supported the bill, and 44 Democrats voted against it).  While elements of the legislation could create jobs by inducing demand for energy efficiency improvements to buildings and alternative energy generation, no one is certain of the true impact on the economy.  AGC believes that the bill goes too far too fast and that Congress has not adequately mitigated the impacts.
July 6, 2009
On June 9, AGC submitted comments to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on a proposed rule that would require thousands of facilities to monitor their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions starting in January 2010 and report those emissions to EPA in 2011.  All facilities that produce Portland cement or manufacture lime would be required to report.  Additionally, thousands of small emitters would be scrambling to determine whether their emissions fall within the threshold for reporting or face the risk of high penalties for noncompliance. 
July 2, 2009
Last week, the U.S. House passed H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act, by a vote of 219 to 212 (8 Republicans supported the bill, and 44 Democrats voted against it).  While elements of the legislation could create jobs by inducing demand for energy efficiency improvements to buildings and alternative energy generation, no one is certain of the true impact on the economy.  AGC believes that the bill goes too far too fast and that Congress has not adequately mitigated the impacts.
July 2, 2009
AGC of America urged the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to not issue a final endangerment finding that current concentrations of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the atmosphere endanger public health and welfare and that new motor vehicles (and engines) contribute to this endangerment.  An endangerment finding under the Clean Air Act (CAA) would open the door for EPA to control GHG emissions under the Act. 
July 1, 2009
AGC's new online recycling toolkit will help contractors recycle construction and demolition (C&D) debris and reuse industrial materials in new construction projects.  AGC worked with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Industrial Resources Council (IRC) to make this tool available.
June 30, 2009
As of June 26, 2009, all new construction and major renovation projects registering to use the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating SystemTM need to use the newest version-LEED 2009. The changes to the rating system are part of an over-arching evolution of the LEED system-LEED Version 3.  In this guest article, AGC Environmental Network Steering Committee Chair Thomas Taylor (Vertegy, an Alberici Enterprise) provides a quick look at some of the changes in the new version.
June 26, 2009
On June 18, the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee passed S. 787 the Clean Water Restoration Act.  The legislation was offered as an amendment sponsored by Chairwoman Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), Senator Max Baucus(D-Mont.) and Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.). Republican committee members criticized the bill as a substantial expansion of federal jurisdiction over water by removing the term "navigable" waterways.
June 26, 2009
In close coordination with the AGC of California and its San Diego Chapter, AGC of America continues to press California for relief from its potentially nationwide rule on off-road diesel emissions.   Last December, AGC petitioned the California Air Resources Board (CARB) to reopen the rule.  AGC also urged the U.S.
June 25, 2009
The U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote Friday on the American Clean Energy and Security Act (ACES), a bill that would require "cap and trade" and other regulatory schemes to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from stationary and mobile sources.  AGC supports reasonable climate change policies that would reduce GHG emissions while maintaining the competitiveness of U.S.
June 24, 2009
Active construction sites that store certain quantities of "oil" must prepare and implement Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plans by November 10, 2010, to prevent the discharge of oil to navigable waters, per a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rule published last week.  This action once again extends the compliance dates for construction sites and other "facilities" covered by EPA's oil SPCC requirements - and comes just in time to wipe out the prior July 1, 2009 deadline.  Following is a description of the SPCC program deadlines, the construction sites subject to the rules and EPA's streamlined amendments that resulted from AGC's multi-year effort to make the program more workable for contractors.

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