News

Safety & Health

December 18, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

Listen Here: Natural Disaster Impacts On Construction Projects – PART 1

December 5, 2019

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued a temporary enforcement policy to allow for crane operator certifications issued prior to December 2, 2019 by the Crane Institute Certification (CIC) to be temporarily accepted by the agency. OSHA requires crane operators engaged in construction activity to be certified by an entity holding accreditation through a nationally recognized agency. CIC no longer holds such accreditation.

November 12, 2019

Construction technology provider and national trade organization launch grant program to help address industry need for better-fitting personal protective equipment (PPE) for women working at heights

September 19, 2017

On Sept. 7, AGC held a comprehensive webinar detailing not only the requirements of the U.S. the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) respirable crystalline silica standard for the construction industry, but also the perspective of and testimonials from prime and specialty contractors implementing the regulation.

April 12, 2017

Need a vendor? Reach thousands of suppliers and service providers in one place: AGC's official purchasing directory, Constructor Marketplace. This site places you in contact with vendors from more than 50 categories -- everything from acoustical and drywall to windows -- quickly, so you can get the materials or the help you need to get the job done right. Use Constructor Marketplace's free Request for Proposal (RFP) Automator to request custom project bids from multiple Marketplace vendors with just a few clicks.

April 4, 2017

The Associated General Contractors of America unveiled a new study designed to improve the safety of construction workers as it announced that two-thirds of metro areas added construction jobs during the past 12 months.  Association officials said the new safety study is designed to help construction firms prevent workplace fatalities and injuries. 

December 22, 2016

On Dec. 19, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published a final rule to revise existing language in the recordkeeping regulation to emphasize an employer’s responsibility to make and maintain accurate OSHA 300 Logs and all related incident reports.  The new rule drastically expands on the existing regulatory language and in some cases added new provisions.  While the newly published rule does make clear OSHA’s expectations involving the maintenance of injury and illness records, the true impetus for the rulemaking is to drastically expand the agency’s statute of limitation granted by the OSH Act. The OSH Act clearly states that “no citations may be issued after the expiration of six months following the occurrence of any violation.” However, this new rule will allow contractors to be cited for honest mistakes, or inaccuracies, related to recordkeeping dating back as far as five-and-a-half years.  OSHA’s justification is that an omission of an injury or illness from the OSHA 300 Log constitutes an ongoing occurrence until corrected during the five-year retention period under the recordkeeping regulation. 

October 24, 2016

Learn More on AGC WebED Oct. 31 from 2-3:00 p.m. ET

Pages

Subscribe to Safety & Health
Go to top