The rule adds requirements to an already complicated permitting process and ignores permitting reforms previously passed by Congress.

You may recall, AGC of America filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) challenging the agency’s new final rule that designates two widely used per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) as hazardous substances under the Superfund law, or Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). This rule imposes significant financial and legal burdens on contractors and could lead to costly litigation and stricter waste disposal practices.

AGC has notched some big wins in the courts in the last year and hopes to carry that momentum with litigation to protect construction companies.

AGC recently released a new resource that provides contractors with tools to communicate effectively with project teams and successfully navigate the complexities of carbon reporting for a project. It describes a process for identifying accountability, what to track and report, and how to do so. Next steps? AGC has some options for you to learn more about the playbook and carbon reporting in general.

This week, AGC of America, in collaboration with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Waste Recycling Association, filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) challenging the agency’s new final rule that designates two widely used per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) as hazardous substances under the Superfund law (also known as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (or CERCLA). This rule imposes significant financial and legal burdens on contractors and could lead to costly litigation and stricter waste disposal practices.

Earlier this year, AGC of America filed a coalition amicus brief with the U.S. Supreme Court, supporting a water utility sector’s request for the Court to clarify whether Clean Water Act (CWA) NPDES (National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System) permits can include generic prohibitions. AGC members have noted these generic prohibitions in permits nationwide. This language does not provide a compliance path for permittees and exposes them to enforcement, criminal penalties, and citizen suits for activities that conform to the permit. On May 28, the Court issued an order granting certiorari, meaning it will hear the case.

On May 17, AGC and its coalition peers responded to a recent White House Office of Management and Budget (OMB) request for feedback on methods and practices for advancing public participation and community engagement (PPCE). The comments urge the agency to recognize the importance of engagement with the regulated community, enhance participation and accessibility, and improve transparency.

On May 22, the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works passed the AGC-backed Water Resources Development Act of 2024 (WRDA 2024).

Check out learning opportunities for environmental and sustainability professionals