Grappling with the maze of marijuana laws and your company policy? On this episode, Bill Judge of Drug Screening Compliance Institute talks about considerations for employers to create and enforce drug-testing policies that are consistent with the laws in all of the states in which they operate – as well as best practices for addressing safety-sensitive roles. Guest: William J. Judge, JD, LL.M. Drug Screening Compliance Institute bjudge@drugscreeningci.com www.askbilljudge.com Resources: At the federal level, marijuana is listed as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act. Many federal contractors and all federal grantees are required by law to establish and maintain a drug-free workplace policy. In addition, some federal agencies have rules in place for specific industries/occupations that require employers to have drug testing programs. For example, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety AdminSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)istration (FMCSA) have adopted drug testing rules for certain drivers. The provides guidance to employers on how to implement drug-free workplaces that will comply with federal laws. States are continuing to legalize marijuana, either for medical use, recreational use, or both. Here are maps of where things currently stand in September 2022. State laws may dictate how (and to what extent) employers can do pre-employment screenings, drug testing, or make employment decisions based on an employee’s drug use. Many employers choose to drug test employees because of safety-sensitive positions, reductions in rates for workers’ compensation insurance, or to ensure that their employees are not impaired on the job. It is particularly important that construction companies review current policies and evaluate the need for changes – based on evolving marijuana laws and to ensure employee safety and reduce company risk.
AGC goes to the U.S. Supreme Court to defend the practice of pre-bid interaction between public owners and contactors that ultimately leads to better RFPs and projects.
Grappling with the maze of marijuana laws and your company policy? On this episode, Bill Judge of Drug Screening Compliance Institute talks about considerations for employers to create and enforce drug-testing policies that are consistent with the laws in all of the states in which they operate – as well as best practices for addressing safety-sensitive roles. Guest: William J. Judge, JD, LL.M. Drug Screening Compliance Institute bjudge@drugscreeningci.com www.askbilljudge.com Resources: At the federal level, marijuana is listed as a Schedule I drug under the Controlled Substances Act. Many federal contractors and all federal grantees are required by law to establish and maintain a drug-free workplace policy. In addition, some federal agencies have rules in place for specific industries/occupations that require employers to have drug testing programs. For example, the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) have adopted drug testing rules for certain drivers. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) provides guidance to employers on how to implement drug-free workplaces that will comply with federal laws. States are continuing to legalize marijuana, either for medical use, recreational use, or both. Here are maps of where things currently stand in September 2022. State laws may dictate how (and to what extent) employers can do pre-employment screenings, drug testing, or make employment decisions based on an employee’s drug use. Many employers choose to drug test employees because of safety-sensitive positions, reductions in rates for workers’ compensation insurance, or to ensure that their employees are not impaired on the job. It is particularly important that construction companies review current policies and evaluate the need for changes – based on evolving marijuana laws and to ensure employee safety and reduce company risk.
AGC has the latest on Senator Joe Manchin’s (D-W.Va.) legislation for his long-awaited permitting reform for energy infrastructure, as the clock ticks towards another government shutdown.
The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) has granted an extension for federal contractors to object to the release of their EEO-1 data. The new deadline is October 19, 2022. With the deadline still looming, Alissa Horvitz of the law firm Roffman Horvitz provided AGC of America a guide for contractors covered by this FOIA request to follow as they consider their options and potentially object to their particular company’s EEO-1 release. Objection guide can be found here.
AGC's Construction HR & Training Professionals Conference is right around the corner! Register by September 23rd to lock in the lowest rate for your HRTED '22 experience. Book your room today to secure your discounted AGC group rate of $245 per night.
Do the risks outweigh the benefits of using prefabricated construction on your next project? ConsensusDocs recently held a webinar and emphatically concluded that, yes, the benefits far outweigh the risk so long as you have the right contractual tools to address the many small and large issues that arise when using prefabrication. In addition, new proposed federal rules may change how off-site work is treated under Davis-Bacon and the application of prevailing wages. However, the trend toward prefabrication, especially in a post-Covid-19 outbreak construction world, will undoubtedly continue.