Construction Law

February 13, 2015
Register Now & Save $100! Want to learn about the latest federal agency projects set to hit the street in your market? Need to brush up on the latest barrage of federal regulations your business must follow?  Attend the AGC Federal Contractors Conference May 12-14, 2015, at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. to learn all this information and more to help ensure you stay ahead of your competition.
February 12, 2015
House Small Business Committee to Introduce Legislation Soon Earlier today, Randall Gibson—AGC NAVFAC Committee chair and president of Whitesell-Green, a small general contractor based in Florida—testified on behalf of AGC before the House Small Business Committee on a host of procurement reform issues. In the testimony, AGC encouraged members of the committee and Congress to:
February 12, 2015
Legislation has been introduced in both the House and Senate to nullify the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rule on representation-case procedures. Visit AGC’s Legislative Action Center and write to your elected officials urging them to support this legislation.  The AGC-opposed rule will go into effect April 14 unless Congress acts or a litigation challenge is successful.
February 12, 2015
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has different definitions of what constitutes a seasonal employee or worker when determining the size of an employer and whether an employer must offer insurance to those employees.
February 12, 2015
Visit www.HardhatsforHighways.org and Tell Congress to Solve the Transportation Funding Problem On Wednesday, the House Committee on Transportation & Infrastructure held their kickoff hearing on surface transportation reauthorization.  The current authorization expires on May 31.  The only witness was Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx, who pitched the committee on the need for the administration’s reauthorization proposal, the GROW AMERICA Act. 
February 12, 2015
Yesterday, the House of Representatives passed a bill to approve construction of the Keystone XL pipeline by a vote of 270-152.  Twenty-nine Democrats voted to support the measure, which passed the Senate on Jan. 29.  The bill faces an expected veto by President Obama, who says he wants the State Department to finish an ongoing review process before deciding to approve the project.
February 6, 2015
On Feb. 2, President Obama released his $4 trillion fiscal year (FY) 2016 budget request.  The budget calls for tax changes to offset increased spending for defense, infrastructure and job training and education programs.  The budget also includes tax increases for corporations and top individual earners.
February 6, 2015
Visit www.HardhatsforHighways.org Today Time is running out for members of the House to sign the bipartisan letter, authored by Transportation & Infrastructure Committee Members Reid Ribble (R-Wis.) and Dan Lipinksi (D-Ill.), along with Ways & Means Committee Members Tom Reed (R-N.Y.) and Bill Pascrell (D-N.J.), and commit to supporting transportation funding initiatives. 
February 6, 2015

In addition to a lawsuit challenging the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) new representation-case procedures rule (also known as the Quickie Election rule), legislation in Congress will be considered that would nullify the rule. The Congressional Review Act (CRA) is a resolution that would nullify the regulation, if passed by both chambers and signed by the president. The resolution could be introduced in the Senate as early as next week and a similar proposal will make its way through the House. The CRA is a powerful procedural tool that Congress can use to exert oversight over the administration and requires only a simple majority in the Senate, therefore eliminating the typical 60 vote threshold needed in the Senate to pass legislation. While the CRA has been used successfully once before, it would remain unlikely that the president would sign such a bill and therefore the best option for blocking the rule remains the judicial challenge.

February 6, 2015
The House passed legislation this week that would repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) by a vote of 239 to 186.  The vote was decided almost entirely on party lines with no Democrats supporting it. The vote was the first repeal vote for the new Congress; however, even if the bill made it to the president’s desk, he has indicated that he would veto the bill.  The plans for a repeal vote in the Senate remain uncertain.  They may take up bipartisan legislation that replaces the ACA’s definition of a full-time employee at 30 hours-per-week with the more traditional definition of 40 hours-per-week, which passed the House earlier this year.

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