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The people I've met through AGC have helped me both personally and professionally. Every contractor needs those resources and those relationships. If you want to be successful, well then, you need AGC.

Phyllis Harden

Legislative & Special Projects, Pine Bluff Sand & Gravel
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Construction Law

September 1, 2015
Jon O'Brien, Master Builders Association

LinkedIn has been called Facebook for professionals, the virtual rolodex, and the headhunter’s haven to name a few. Regardless of what you call this online network, LinkedIn can be important for business development. Before delving into LinkedIn business development advice, let’s look at why LinkedIn is beneficial for the construction industry.

August 1, 2015
Cynthia Paul, FMI Corporation

Have you ever noticed that some people and companies just seem to stand out, and everywhere you turn, they are being quoted or interviewed or are consistently receiving better scores on proposals? They are not much different than others; but, like the old E.F. Hutton advertisement asserts, when they speak, people listen. So what is the difference?

In a world of specialized expertise, everyone, from owners of construction projects to your company looking for new talent, wants people with deep expertise and a proven track record of generating results. Being good at what you do, however, is not enough to make you or your company shine; people need to know that you are good at what you do.

If you want to stop being that hidden jewel or are looking to make your company’s proposals stand out more, try these few quick tips for getting recognized in writing.

July 1, 2015
Chuck Fenske, Knoch Corporation

In order to execute a successful business development program, it is important to define what business development truly means and what steps are required to make it so. At its core, business development is the strategic manufacturing of revenue growth opportunities. While some use the term as a synonym for sales and others include mergers and acquisitions, business development actually involves a broader scope including corporate strategy, marketing, sales, and human resources. Each of these are prevalent throughout the following steps, which outline a successful business development process.

July 1, 2015
Chuck Fenske, Knoch Corporation

In order to execute a successful business development program, it is important to define what business development truly means and what steps are required to make it so. At its core, business development is the strategic manufacturing of revenue growth opportunities. While some use the term as a synonym for sales and others include mergers and acquisitions, business development actually involves a broader scope including corporate strategy, marketing, sales, and human resources. Each of these are prevalent throughout the following steps, which outline a successful business development process.

June 1, 2015
George Calys, Acumen

Congratulations. You made the shortlist. Now comes the interview. While it's not rocket science, it is work to pull off a great presentation. Here are 10 essential things to consider before every presentation.

May 1, 2015
Mel Lester, The Business Edge

When I first started writing proposals back in the mid-1980s, adding a few graphics was a fairly radical concept. There seemed to be a widespread expectation that technical service proposals must be staid and boring – nothing but the facts, ma'am. Now, attractive layouts, color, and ample graphics are common features in our proposals.

But the proposals I've reviewed in recent years still lack effective design for the most part. While they are generally appealing to look at, they fail to meet the most important document design criterion – function.

Effective design goes beyond pretty; it facilitates better communication. Let me suggest a few design tips that will distinguish your proposals, not just in terms of their visual impact, but also in their ability to clearly convey your message(s) to your prospects.

April 1, 2015
Charles H. Green  

Have you ever had a difficult client? I don't mean the client from hell, I just mean garden-variety difficult. Difficult clients come in lots of different flavors.

• There's the client who will not take the time up front to share critical information, explore ideas, or otherwise involve you in the early stages of a project.

• There's the client who just cannot make a decision, regardless of how much data or analyses you provide at their request.

• There's the client who is frozen by politics or fear or ignorance, who will not face facts about critical issues.

• Finally, there's the client with personality issues, who argues, or rejects, or is otherwise disrespectful to you and your team, yet often shows favoritism to someone else or another team.

Fortunately, there is a common thread to all of these cases, which--if we understand it--can help us succeed.

The common thread has nothing to do with the clients. The common thread is us.

February 27, 2015

Yesterday, the Senate Environment & Public Works Committee held their second hearing as they look to complete a highway bill prior to the expiration of the current extension on May 31.

February 27, 2015

On Jan. 30, President Obama released new Executive Order 13690, “The Federal Flood Risk Management Standard (FFRMS),” as directed by the President’s Climate Action Plan.  Notably, the order expands the definition of “floodplain” (higher flood elevation and expanded flood hazard areas) by creating a new national minimum standard that all federal agencies must use – and builders must follow – for all federally-approved or funded projects. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is soliciting public input on newly released “guidelines” that will instruct federal agencies on how to implement the new standard.

February 27, 2015

On Tuesday, President Obama vetoed a House- and Senate-passed bill approving construction of the Keystone XL pipeline. The president claimed that the bill bypassed the State Department’s process of determining whether the project is in the national interest. According to the White House, once that determination is made, “there will not be a significant delay in announcing the results of that review and ultimately making a decision on the project.”

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